The Latest

Jul 29, 2014 / 293 notes
Jul 29, 2014 / 35,778 notes

(via mangledminds)

Jul 29, 2014 / 14,355 notes

Your third eye acts as a way to see into the non-physical reality that we are apart of and co-exist alongside of. Humans are points of consciousness, manifested into physical dimensions. All that we do, feel, think, dream of, envision, act on, etc. have ripples of energy attached. It’s up to you, how you use this knowledge. Om

(via mentalalchemy)

Jul 28, 2014 / 112,193 notes

(via hailmaryjane)

Jul 28, 2014 / 199,226 notes
  • fucking hell my dad was carving the chicken for dinner and all of a sudden i just hear him manically giggling to himself so i fucking go into the kitchen and this is what i fucking find

image

  • jesus christ dad what the fuck 
  • except no.
  • with the fake text posts lbr we kno u decapitated a bratz doll for the sad, sad purpose of this post

image

(via supernovaqirl)

39. negative space
Jul 28, 2014 / 162,212 notes

39. negative space

(via imp3rmanent)

As a veterinarian who specializes in behavioral medicine, Dr. Vint Virga has treated many household pets in his clinic. But for the past five years he has been working mostly with leopards, wolves, bears, zebras and other animals living in zoos and wildlife parks. He deals with such issues as appetites, anxiety and obsessive behavior.
In the interview he discusses how zoos have changed to improve the animals’ well being:
"I think the most important things that zoos have done in the past 10, 20 years, is that they [have] focused primarily on the animal’s well-being. And, depending on their feedback and responses, looked at their behavior, looked at their overall happiness and contentment and used that as the gauge for what to do for the animal.
They’ve also applied as much [as] science knows about the animals in nature. What that looks like is providing them with a space that’s a lot more rich and full than just a place that is an exhibit. So it’s really shifting from not a cage, because most zoos don’t even have those anymore, but from an exhibit to a habitat. The environment is much richer and more complex rather than flat and uniform, so that we can see them.
[Zoos are] providing [animals with] opportunities to escape from view of the public — and that can be difficult for a zoo. … Visitors complain to the zoo if they can’t see the leopard, the bear or the lion. But on the other hand, if the lion doesn’t have any choice of getting away from the public at times, particularly if there [are] crowds or noisy visitors, then we’re taking away their sense of control over their environment.”
Jul 27, 2014 / 2,467 notes

As a veterinarian who specializes in behavioral medicine, Dr. Vint Virga has treated many household pets in his clinic. But for the past five years he has been working mostly with leopards, wolves, bears, zebras and other animals living in zoos and wildlife parks. He deals with such issues as appetites, anxiety and obsessive behavior.

In the interview he discusses how zoos have changed to improve the animals’ well being:

"I think the most important things that zoos have done in the past 10, 20 years, is that they [have] focused primarily on the animal’s well-being. And, depending on their feedback and responses, looked at their behavior, looked at their overall happiness and contentment and used that as the gauge for what to do for the animal.

They’ve also applied as much [as] science knows about the animals in nature. What that looks like is providing them with a space that’s a lot more rich and full than just a place that is an exhibit. So it’s really shifting from not a cage, because most zoos don’t even have those anymore, but from an exhibit to a habitat. The environment is much richer and more complex rather than flat and uniform, so that we can see them.

[Zoos are] providing [animals with] opportunities to escape from view of the public — and that can be difficult for a zoo. … Visitors complain to the zoo if they can’t see the leopard, the bear or the lion. But on the other hand, if the lion doesn’t have any choice of getting away from the public at times, particularly if there [are] crowds or noisy visitors, then we’re taking away their sense of control over their environment.”

Jul 27, 2014 / 477,201 notes
Jul 27, 2014 / 1,074 notes
when Jim Henson, creator of the Muppets died in 1990, Disney released this picture of Mickey consoling Kermit the Frog
May 16, 2014 / 581,973 notes

when Jim Henson, creator of the Muppets died in 1990, Disney released this picture of Mickey consoling Kermit the Frog

(via imerasingyouandimhappy)

Just finished this smaller version of “Divine Playground”. SOLD
Mar 9, 2014 / 7,447 notes

Just finished this smaller version of “Divine Playground”. SOLD

Mar 9, 2014 / 95,745 notes

image

me tryna flirt

(via dutchster)

To war and glory!
Mar 9, 2014 / 1,851 notes

To war and glory!

Mar 9, 2014 / 122,184 notes

(via dutchster)

Mar 9, 2014 / 498 notes

(via niknak79)